Warrants

A warrant is like an option, where the holder has the choice and rights (not necessity) to buy a particular amount of shares at a specific rate and time in the future.

A warrant is the right to buy shares of the company at a specific price, or the strike price. A warrant is like an option, where the holder has the choice and rights (not necessity) to buy a particular amount of shares at a specific rate and time in the future. They work well for a specific period of time and become ineffective as soon as they expire.

Unlike an option that is a tool of the stock exchange, warrants are issued by the company. Moreover, warrants have the following parts:

  • As soon as the holder tells the issuer that they want to buy the shares, the warrant is exercised and stocks are issued.
  • After the bond is issued, the exercise price is fixed.
  • The premium of a warrant refers to the additional amount you need to pay for the shares when buying it through the warrant.
  • Warrants differ based on the country you are in.
  • Warrants give leverage.
  • The conversion ratio is the number of warrants that are required to sell or buy one stock.
  • There is an expiration date for the warrants.

If the stock price rises above the amount mentioned in the warrant, the investor can exercise the warrant and purchase the shares at a lower price. For instance, let’s say that the strike price of a share is $25 as per the warrant, and the FMV of the share increases to $30 per share, the investor can redeem the warrant and purchase the shares at $20 per share. On the contrary, if the value of the shares does not increase, and the warrant eventually expires, it would become worthless.

If you still need any help or have some questions regarding warrants, Eqvista can help in explaining it to you. Our Eqvista cap table software can help you track all the shares of your company. So, sign up today or contact us for more details!

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